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Steamboat Movie Times

Feb. 12 through Feb. 18

“The Choice” PG-13—
5:45 p.m. Friday
12:30 and 5:45 p.m.

“Kung Fu Panda 3” PG—
5 and 7:30 p.m. Friday
12, 2:30, 5 and 7:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday

“Pride & Prejudice & Zombies” PG-13—
8:20 p.m. Friday
3:10 and 8:20 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday
3:10 p.m. Thursday

“Zoolander 2” PG-13—
5:35 and 8:10 p.m. Friday
12:20, 3, 5:35 and 8:10 p.m. Sunday through Thursday

“How to be Single” R—
5:25 and 8 p.m. Friday
12:10, 2:45, 5:25 and 8 Sunday though Thursday

“Deadpool” R—
4:40, 5:55, 7:15 and 8:30 p.m. Friday
12:45, 2, 3:20, 4:40, 5:55, 7:15 and 8:30 p.m.

“Race” PG-13—
8:20 p.m. starts Thursday, Feb. 18


Feb. 5 through Feb. 11

“The Finest Hours” PG-13—
2, 4:50 and 7:40 p.m. Friday through Sunday
4:50 and 7:40 p.m. Monday through Wednesday
4:50 p.m. Thursday

“The Revenant” R—
1:10, 4:30 and 7:50 p.m. Friday through Sunday
4:30 and 7:50 p.m. Monday through Wednesday
4:30 p.m. Thursday

“The Choice” PG-13—
1:40, 4:40 and 7:30 p.m. Friday through Sunday
4:40 and 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday

”13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi” R—
1:50 and 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday
5 p.m. Monday through Thursday

“The 5th Wave” PG-13—
8:10 p.m. Daily

“Kung Fu Panda 3” PG—
5:10 p.m. 3D Daily
1, 3:20 and 7:20 p.m. Friday through Sunday
7:20 p.m. Monday through Wednesday

“Pride & Prejudice & Zombies” PG-13—
2:20, 5:40 and 8:20 p.m. Friday through Sunday
5:40 and 8:20 p.m. Monday through Thursday

“Zoolander 2” PG-13—
7:20 p.m. starts Thursday, Feb. 11

“How to be Single” R—
7:40 p.m. starts Thursday, Feb. 11

“Deadpool” R—
7:50 p.m. starts Thursday, Feb. 11


Jan. 29 through Feb.4

“The Finest Hours” PG-13—
4:40 p.m. 3D Daily
7:40 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:3 and 4:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The Revenant” R—
4:30 and 7:50 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:20, 4:30 and 7:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“Ride Along 2” PG-13—
5:30 and 8:20 p.m. Friday and Monday through Wednesday
2:30, 5:30 and 8:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
5:30 p.m. Thursday

”13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi” R—
4:50 and 8 p.m. Friday and Monday though Thursday
1:40, 4:50 and 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“Dirty Grandpa” R—
5:45 and 8:20 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
12:50, 3:20, 5:45 and 8:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The 5th Wave” PG-13—
5:35 and 8:10 p.m. Friday and Monday through Wednesday
12:25, 3, 5:35 and 8:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
5:35 p.m. Thursday

“Kung Fu Panda 3” PG—
5:10 p.m. 3D Daily
7:30 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
12:30, 2:50 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“Pride & Prejudice & Zombies” PG-13—
8:10 p.m. starts Thursday, Feb. 4


Jan. 22 through Jan. 28

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” PG-13—
4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:30, 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The Revenant” R—
4:40 and 8 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:20, 4:40 and 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“Ride Along 2” PG-13—
5:30 and 8:20 p.m. Friday and Monday through Wednesday
2:30, 5:30 and 8:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
5:30 p.m. Thursday

”13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi” R—
5 and 8:10 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:45, 5 and 8:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“Dirty Grandpa” R—
5:10 and 7:50 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
2:15, 5:10 and 7:50 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The 5th Wave” PG-13—
4:50 and 7:40 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
2, 4:50 and 7:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The Finest Hours” PG-13—
8:20 p.m. starts Thursday, Jan. 28


Jan. 15 through Jan. 21

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” PG-13—
4:15 p.m. 3D Daily
1:10 and 7:20 p.m. Friday though Monday
7:20 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday

“The Revenant” R—
1, 4:25 and 8 p.m. Friday through Monday
4:25 and 8 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday

“Ride Along 2” PG-13—
12:45, 3:10, 5:40 and 8:10 p.m. Friday through Monday
5:40 and 8:10 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday

”Spotlight” R—
1:45, 4:45 and 7:40 p.m. Friday through Monday
4:45 and 7:40 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday

“The Big Short” R—
1:30, 4:35 and 7:30 p.m. Friday through Monday
4:35 and 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday

“Daddy’s Home” PG-13—
12:30, 2:55, 5:20 and 7:50 p.m. Friday through Monday
5:20 and 7:50 p.m. Tuesday through Wednesday
5:20 p.m. Thursday

“Dirty Grandpa” R—
7:50 p.m. starts Thursday, Jan. 21


Jan. 8 through Jan. 14

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens” PG-13—
4:40 p.m. 3D Daily
7:40 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:30 and 7:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The Revenant” R—
4:30 and 7:50 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:10, 4:30 and 7:50 p.m.Saturday and Sunday

”Joy” PG-13—
4:05 and 7:20 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
1:05, 4:05 and 7:20 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“The Hateful Eight” R—
4:20 and 8 p.m. Friday and Monday through Thursday
12:50, 4:20 and 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

“Daddy’s Home” PG-13—
5:45 and 8:10 p.m. Friday and Monday through Wednesday
1, 3:25, 5:45 and 8:10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
5:45 p.m. Thursday

“Ride Along 2” PG-13—
8:10 p.m. starts Thursday, Jan. 14


“How to be Single”
Romantic Comedy, R, 110 minutes
At this point the modern urban romantic comedy is probably past the point of reinvention. After decades of aerial shots of the New York City skyline (sometimes it's San Francisco or Chicago or even Some Other Gorgeous City skyline), musical interludes featuring pop songs reflecting the romantic status of the lead characters, just about every Meet Cute imaginable, breakup scenes where someone says, "I can't do this anymore," and countless finales where someone finally comes to his/her senses and shows up just in time to deliver the most perfect "I can't live without you" speech, we've been there, done that. "How to Be Single" delivers on all counts. Dakota Johnson and Rebel Wilson are the standouts in one of the most endearing romantic comedies in recent memory, It's one of the most endearing romantic comedies in recent memory, with some laugh-out-loud dialogue, gorgeous photography and uniformly charming performances from the entire cast. Sure, it's corny and manipulative, and at times the plausibility is stretched beyond even the movie-fantasy romance. I got that. But I was smitten anyway.
Rating: Three and a half stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Zoolander 2”
Comedy, PG-13, 100 minutes
For "Austin Powers in Goldmember," the third installment of the franchise in 2002, a bounty of big-name celebrities, from Tom Cruise to Katie Couric to Danny DeVito to John Travolta to Gwyneth Paltrow, made some hilarious cameos. Such a gimmick was hardly a new idea even then, but "Goldmember" co-writer and star Mike Myers and director Jay Roach executed the celebrity cameo drive-by with precise comedic timing. There was a PURPOSE to these famous faces appearing in the movie. Cut to 2016 and "Zoolander 2," director/co-writer/star Ben Stiller's follow-up to the 2001 fashion world satire, which was a mild hit (domestic box office gross of $45 million) upon its release, but became something of a cult favorite over the years. (To this day, some millennials will dress up for Halloween as Stiller's Derek Zoolander or Owen Wilson's Hansel or Will Ferrell's Mugatu.) Ben Stiller's shallow and grating male model character reunites with best friend Hansel (Owen Wilson) to help solve some pop star murders. Celebrity cameos abound, but with few exceptions, their visual sight gags or one-liners fall flat with a resounding thud.
Rating: One and a half stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Deadpool”
Sci-fi superhero, R, 108 minutes
If only "Deadpool" were as clever, dark and funny as it believes itself to be. Self-satisfied to the point of irritation, "Deadpool" is the latest in an apparently endless supply of superhero films -- and like just about every other new superhero movie, it's clearly designed as the launching point for a future franchise. (See "Daredevil," "Catwoman," "The Green Hornet" and not one but two "Fantastic Four" efforts. Actually, I like you, so please DON'T see any of those movies.) Directed with no small amount of flash and style by Tim Miller, "Deadpool" stars Ryan Reynolds in a bit of casting that's almost too easy, seeing as how the character of Deadpool is a real wisenheimer, and Reynolds has long specialized in playing fast-talking quipsters. Self-satisfied to the point of irritation, this Ryan Reynolds vehicle serves notice that it's as much about spoofing the superhero genre and winking at the audience as it is about serving up a genuine storyline. If only "Deadpool" were as clever, dark and funny as it believes itself to be.
Rating: Two and a half stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The Choice”
Romance, PG-13, 110 minutes
Nobody, and I mean nobody, cranks out more romance tragedy porn than Nicholas Sparks. Sparks writes the novels and Hollywood makes the movies, and just about every time out, you get your sun-dappled Carolina romance and your PG-13 sex scenes and your crusty but lovable elderly folk and your cute reaction shots of kids and dogs -- and somebody's gonna wind up in a coma or revealing a tragic past or otherwise looking death in the eye."The Choice" is classic Sparks, and by that I mean it's a mediocre, well-photographed, undeniably heart-tugging, annoyingly manipulative and dramatically predictable star-crossed romance. The timeline wouldn't always fit, but so many Nicholas Sparks characters occupy the same general area that I'd like to see a movie where they all get together for a Tragedy-Off. My money's on the "Dear John" team. But it could be close.
Rating: Two stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Pride & Prejudice & Zombies”
Drama, R, 187 minutes
Question: Is there no end to the tsunami of material that has sprung from Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice”? Answer: Apparently not. All great respect to Ms. Austen and her classic novel, but we've seen so many film and television adaptations, not to mention modern twists such as "Bridget Jones's Diary" and the web series "The Lizzie Bennet Diaries," and the Bollywood gem "Bride & Prejudice," and the time-travel-themed "Lost in Austen" miniseries, etc., that if we must get another variation on the story, the weirder the better. "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies"? Bring it on. Heck, I'd rather see "Pride and Prejudice and Wolverines," or "Pride and Prejudice and Enormous, Man-Eating Rabbits." Anything but a straightforward telling of the tale. As was the case with the bloody, campy, guilty pleasure "Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter" (also based on a novel by Seth Grahame-Smith), the title pretty much says it all. In this extra-weird twist on Jane Austen's classic story, Mrs. Bennet tries to marry off her daughters against the backdrop of a great zombie apocalypse. Director Burr Steers does a nifty job of rocketing from period-piece romance to gory bloodshed, with sprinkles of dark humor here and there.
Rating: Three stars.

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The Finest Hours”
Adventure drama, PG-13, 114 minutes
As crew members try to keep their wrecked tanker afloat, a four-man Coast Guard team rushes to their rescue. Props to the cast of "The Finest Hours," most of whom spend about three-quarters of their onscreen time soaking wet. Yeah yeah yeah -- they're pampered actors and they're really not at risk and no doubt there were fluffy warm towels and changes of clothes waiting for them at the end of the day, but still. These guys are so thoroughly drenched I wouldn't be surprised to hear a couple of them had shrunk by an inch by the end of filming. If only "The Finest Hours" had a screenplay worthy of the heroics depicted here, and a director who could have resisted wave after wave of schmaltz and melodrama. Though based on true events, "The Finest Hours" plays like a hokey, cornball 1950s-era drama filled with stock characters, and weakened by a sappy ending so over the top it actually dilutes the impact of what many call the greatest small-boat rescue mission in Coast Guard history. "The Finest Hours" feels stitched together. None of the three main plot lines is particularly powerful or moving. We're never invested in these characters the way we were with, say, the leads in "The Perfect Storm." The heroism of that small-boat crew from 1952 deserves a special film. This is not it.
Rating: Two stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

”Dirty Grandpa”
Comedy, R, 97 minutes
If I'd had access to the script for "Dirty Grandpa" before filming commenced, I seriously would have considered a crowdsourcing effort to raise whatever funds necessary to pay Robert De Niro to NOT do this movie. Mere words cannot do justice to how terrible this movie is from start to finish, but I'll try anyway: Awful, abhorrent, vile, offensive, hideous, unspeakable, atrocious, dreadful, appalling, revolting, odious, terrible, lousy, wretched, loathsome, repulsive, grim, repugnant, reprehensible, ugly and just really, really, really bad. Robert De Niro is of course one of the greatest dramatic actors we've ever known. And we learned a long, long time ago he's capable of being funny as hell in the right vehicle. This dreck, though, just makes you hang your head for the great De Niro and hope someone somewhere is writing a role for him worthy of his legacy. If "Dirty Grandpa" isn't the worst movie of 2016, I have some serious cinematic torture in my near future.
Rating: Zero stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

”The 5th Wave”
Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi, PG-13, 112 minutes
When the apocalypse happens, all that’s going to be left for us are the guns. Which might actually be true, but is also the subtext of the dystopian young adult film hitting theaters this weekend, “The 5th Wave.” The film opens with a winsome blonde teen girl executing a man with a military-style assault rifle, and the teen gunplay only goes further from there. The sight of teens with rifles is one we’re used to from news reports of a much more tragic nature, so the imagery definitely gives one pause. Perhaps the reason why some of the themes and imagery hit a bit too close is the way the film creates a recognizable world. In young adult hits of the same genre, such as “The Hunger Games,” “Divergent” or “The Maze Runner” the metaphor has a bit more freedom because the worlds in which they take place are visually fantastical, and therefore removed from our reality. Everything in the “The 5th Wave” feels, or at least looks, real. On the surface, “The 5th Wave” is mindlessly silly enough, but has a weirdly virulent pro-gun, libertarian streak just under the surface. But really, haven’t teens always been the true libertarians?
Rating: One and a half stars

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

”13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi”
Action, R, 144 minutes
So here's Michael "Transformers" Bay directing the guy who played the likable and goofy Jim on "The Office" in a gritty film based on the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, and though that might sound like the premise for an article in the Onion or a satirical trailer on "Funny or Die," this is a solid action thriller with well-choreographed battle sequences and strong work from the ensemble cast. There's very little politicking in "13 Hours," other than a moment when one of the Americans notes the mortar attack had to have been planned weeks in advance. This was no spontaneous demonstration gone horribly wrong, as we were initially told at the time. And of course there's an unspoken but quite loud indictment of the Obama administration and in particular then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Not only did we not see this coming, but for 13 long hours, it was up to a half-dozen civilians to protect American lives. Highly trained former military, to be sure, but civilians nonetheless. This is no "Zero Dark Thirty" or "The Hurt Locker." Lacking in nuance and occasionally plagued by corny dialogue, "13 Hours" is nonetheless a well-photographed, visceral action film, and a sincere and fitting tribute to those secret soldiers.
Rating: Three stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The 5th Wave”
Action, Adventure, Sci-Fi, PG-13, 112 minutes
It’s not quite the most laughable of the many eye-rollingly derivative entries in this overused genre. “The Giver” still takes that prize. But from its love triangle centerpiece, to the adults and institutions that cannot be trusted, the child soldiers trained for Mortal Combat — military style — and the post-Apocalyptic future where only the prettiest survive, “Fifth Wave” never escapes the genre joke that it is. The best elements in “Fifth Wave” are the flashbacks — showing the aliens arriving in their “District 9” spiky spaceships, then subjecting the human race to various special effect cataclysms (“waves”) as they drive us toward extinction. It’s all so obvious and (unintentionally) laugh-out-loud funny. Seriously, if you’re not five steps ahead of “The Fifth Wave,” you need to have yourself tested.
Rating: Two and a half stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“Ride Along 2”
Comedy, PG-13, 102 minutes
Straddling the line between flat-out farce and buddy-cop action movie, "Ride Along 2" is a slick, good-looking, fast-paced and profoundly unoriginal piece of work. This is 100 minutes of recycled shtick -- a cop film with no roots in actual police work, but a deep connection to dozens of other cop films. From the supervisor chewing out the rogue cops to the slick businessman who's actually a crime lord to the obligatory big finale on the docks, "Ride Along 2" is the movie equivalent of a cover band. We've seen it all before, and often in much better films.Director Tim Story's follow-up to the 2014 hit reunites Ice Cube's snarling veteran Atlanta cop, James, with Kevin Hart's pesky motormouth Ben, the former high school security guard who is now a month out of the police academy and a week away from marrying James' sister Angela (Tika Sumpter), whose main function in this film is to look beautiful and shake her head at Ben's wacky antics. We've seen all this recycled shtick before, and often in much better films.
Rating: Two stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The Revenant”
Drama, R, 187 minutes
Get up. Stretch your legs. Go to the movies. Please. The enormously talented Alejandro G. Inarritu ("Amores Perros," "21 Grams," "Birdman") strikes again with this 19th-century American fable, one of the most brutally beautiful movies I've ever seen. Set in the wintry Great Plains of 1823 and filmed with natural light on magnificently unsullied land and waters in Canada and Argentina, "The Revenant" is a visceral sensation, filled with unforgettable visuals and memorable set pieces. Inspired by true events, as they say, and adapted from a 2002 historical novel by Michael Punke, "The Revenant" showcases Leonardo DiCaprio in one of his most impressive performances as Hugh Glass, a frontiersman who was hired as a scout by the Rocky Mountain Trading Co. to guide a team of fur trappers through a territory that some 60-plus years later would become part of South Dakota. I keep saying Tom Hardy is one of the best actors in the world because Tom Hardy IS one of the best actors in the world. He will send a chill up and down your spine even while delivering a seemingly innocuous piece of dialogue.The closing confrontation in "The Revenant" is a bit reminiscent of the gunfight at the end of Robert Altman's masterful "McCabe and Mrs. Miller." It's darkly poetic and unforgettable -- as is the film as a whole.
Rating: Four stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The Hateful Eight”
Drama, R, 187 minutes
Leave it to Quentin Tarantino to give us a three-hour, 70mm, roadshow Western, complete with overture and intermission — with much of the movie set indoors in one spacious room, as if we're watching a filmed stage play. "The Hateful Eight" is Tarantino's second Western in a row, and while it's not as audacious or as provocative or as brutally violent as "Django Unchained," it's still an exhilarating moviegoing experience, filled with wickedly dark humor, nomination-worthy performances and a jigsaw puzzle plot that keeps us guessing until the bloody, brilliant end. t takes a long time for the truth to be revealed, and no doubt some viewers will grow impatient with a three-hour movie that's about 90 percent dialogue and 10 percent action, but Tarantino's screenplay is rich with obscenity-laced, often deeply funny and occasionally even inspirational and patriotic dialogue. The screenplay deserves co-star billing. As Tarantino peels back the layers of deceit and we learn the truth about everyone in the room, it's just a bloody good time. This is one of the best movies of the year.
Rating: Four stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Joy”
Comedy, drama, PG-13, 124 minutes
It's a Cinderella story, complete with mop. "Joy" is a mixed bag -- part dark comedy, part dysfunctional family study, part inspirational tale -- and it ends about 15 minutes after it could have ended. It's not in the same league as "Playbook" or "Hustle," but thanks to some memorable set pieces and the best performance by Jennifer Lawrence since her breakout role in "Winter's Bone," the sometimes-bumpy journey is worth your investment. I wasn't kidding about the whole Cinderella mop thing. For you see, "Joy" is the fictionalized story of one Joy Mangano, the inventor of the Miracle Mop! Every time she takes a step forward, someone or something is there to push her back. No matter. She is a force and a half. Lawrence hits all the right notes in a role that calls for her to be a starry-eyed romantic, a cynic who has given up on love, a loving mother, a loyal friend, a daughter who can never please her father and has to care for her mother, and a fiercely determined inventor and wannabe entrepreneur with an almost obsessive drive to succeed. It's a wonderfully layered performance that carries the film through its rough spots and sometime dubious detours.
Rating: Three stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Daddy’s Home”
Comedy, PG-13, 96 minutes
Even though "Daddy's Home" is set in the New Orleans area and "Sisters" is set in Orlando, it feels as if they're next-door neighbors on Mediocre Boulevard. Like the Amy Poehler-Tina Fey comedy from last week, "Daddy's Home" features a talented and likable duo who have clicked before onscreen. In "Daddy's Home," Will Ferrell plays Brad, a variation on a Will Ferrell character we've seen a dozen times before: a nice guy who's so aggressively, wonderfully, trying-so-hard nice even the children around him sometimes roll their eyes at his corny wholesomeness. Just when aggressively nice Brad (Will Ferrell) is achieving breakthrough status as stepdad to two kids, who shows up but his wife's ex (Mark Wahlberg), a muscled-up stud worshipped by the children. Wahlberg's character never seems all that dangerous, while Ferrell's goes from bland to desperate to off the rails -- and very little about that transition is genuinely funny.
Rating: Two stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Star Wars: The Force Awakens”
Sci-fi adventure, PG-13, 136 minutes
What a beautiful, thrilling, joyous, surprising and heart-thumping adventure this is. The seventh "Star Wars" film pops with memorable battle sequences, gives us chills with encore appearances by stars from the original trilogy and introduces more than a half-dozen terrific Next Generation characters. It's a return to greatness. "The Force Awakens" pops with memorable battle sequences, gives us chills with encore appearances by stars from the original trilogy and introduces more than a half-dozen terrific Next Generation characters. If the U.S. presidential election were held this weekend, director-producer-co-writer J.J. Abrams might carry the day based on geek support alone. "The Force Awakens" is set about 30 years after the events of "Return of the Jedi." Of course Abrams begins with the familiar blue text telling us this all takes place "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away ..." and then we get the iconic yellow crawl text giving us some basic backstory and letting us know where we are now. And then boom! We're off and running. (More often, flying and soaring and zigging and zagging.) Not everyone will love the new "Star Wars." Maybe some fans and critics won't find the fresh characters nearly as memorable as the classics. No doubt some will be flat-out ticked off at certain developments. Better to take such risks than to give us a "Star Wars" sequel that plays it safe or ventures into weirdness and goofiness and Jar Jar Binks. May 26, 2017. That's when "Episode VIII" is scheduled to be released. Can't wait.
Rating: Four stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Sisters”
Comedy, R, 118 minutes
Starting with Chicago's ImprovOlympic in the early 1990s and continuing through "Saturday Night Live" and films and even hosting the Golden Globes with terrific style, Tina Fey and Amy Poehler have been arguably the funniest, smartest, most entertaining comedic duo of the last quarter-century. Not to mention their stellar individual achievements, most notably Fey's "30 Rock" and Poehler's "Parks and Recreation." Year after year, as solo talents and a team, they've been knocking it out of the park. I think they're great, and I'll bet you do as well. So it's with no small reluctance I report "Sisters" is a depressing, overlong, repetitive slapstick disaster in which two of the most appealing stars around wallow in the muck AND the mire, figuratively and literally. Given the screenplay is by longtime "Saturday Night Live" scribe Paula Pell and the director is Jason Moore ("Pitch Perfect"), it's genuinely surprising that "Sisters" reaches for such low-hanging fruit. Even though they look nothing like sisters, they're believable as sisters. Every once in a while when we take a break from the thuddingly unfunny slapstick stuff, there's a nice and genuine moment. But then we're back in the mud. And the mire.
Rating: One and a half stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Creed”
Sports, Drama, PG-13, 113 minutes
When we met Rocky Balboa in 1977, he was a rough-edged, punch-drunk Philadelphia club fighter who worked as an enforcer for a local mobster. Rocky's only friend was Paulie, a brute and a drunk. Cut to present day. Rocky Balboa is almost 70 now. Just about everyone he knew or cared about is gone. He spends his days and nights quietly tending to business at Adrian's, the cozy Italian restaurant named after his beloved late wife.Flash forward a decade, and now the 25ish Adonis (Jordan) is working for a Los Angeles financial firm during the week and sneaking down to Tijuana to fight in brutal, black-market matches on the weekends. While Rocky develops a (sometimes contentious) father-son bond with Adonis. Stallone is no mere supporting player in "Creed." While Adonis' journey is front and center, Rocky is never off-screen for too long. It's arguably Stallone's best piece of acting in the role since he introduced Balboa to audiences nearly 40 years ago. Once again, I find myself saying if this is the last time we see Rocky Balboa, it's a worthy encore.
Rating: Three and a half stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The Good Dinosaur”
Animated adventure, PG, 95 minutes
Ah, there's nothing like a Pixar family film that could give the little ones some serious nightmares. "The Good Dinosaur" is one strange, aggressively gross and dark adventure, featuring a number of frightening storms, some primary characters getting knocked unconscious and/or suffering grievous injuries, creatures eating other creatures -- and biting. "The Good Dinosaur" begins with the premise of a giant asteroid just missing Earth some 65 million years ago, meaning dinosaurs avoided extinction and would eventually share the planet with evolving humans. But dinosaurs -- even talking, bright green, sweet dinosaurs -- don't make for the most visually pleasant animated creatures, and Arlo (Raymond Ochoa) isn't a particularly strong or lovable character compared to so many previous Pixar leads, animal or human. It's been a long road to the big screen for "The Good Dinosaur." The original director was replaced. The release date was delayed a year and a half. There were reports of major changes in the story. The final product reflects that bumpy path. Inconsistent and weird, "The Good Dinosaur" is second-level Pixar all the way.
Rating: Two stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Victor Frankenstein”
Sci-fi adventure, PG-13, 137 minutes
“Victor Frankenstein” is a madcap mashup of three stories — at least as they’re traditionally adapted for the screen — a re-introduction of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein” in a world that has seen Disney’s “Hunchback of Notre Dame” and the Robert Downey Jr. “Sherlock Holmes” movies. And for about 30 sem-frenetic minutes, it works. No, hear me out. Daniel Radcliffe is a hunchbacked mid-Victorian Era circus freak who pines for the aerielist Lorelei (Jessica Brown Findlay, Lady Sybil on “Downton Abbey”). Whatever his lot in life, this bright young man doubles as the circus medic. And when Lorelei takes a fall, he springs into action. The “science” is a series of grotesque — OK, gross — fleshy experiments, all leading to exactly what we expect. Treat the whole thing as a vamp and it kind of works. That first half hour of “makeover” crackles with as much wit as scripter Max “American Ultra” Landis can give it. Alas, the film goes flat as it reaches for the familiar story beats and we realize that all we can recall from director Paul McGuigan’s “Lucky Number Slevin” is its overdose of production design. Still, those who adore the two stars will find some fun here. And if you don’t “know the story,” you won’t be nearly as bored as the rest of us.
Rating: Two stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2”
Sci-fi adventure, PG-13, 137 minutes
"Mockingjay -- Part 2" is a grim, dark, trippy, violent and sometimes just plain bizarre journey, which makes for a fitting if uneven conclusion to a film series that's always been weird. (So weird I'd say the "Twilight" movies, which feature vampires and wolves and humans getting into all sorts of soap opera-y entanglements, might be less insane than the madness of "The Hunger Games.”) Much of "Mockingjay -- Part 2" centers on Katniss and a small platoon of soldiers advancing on the Capitol -- first as part of a propaganda mission, but eventually on the front lines. The blending of CGI and practical effects is impressive, but at times it's difficult to discern just who's getting shot or beaten or otherwise taken out, especially during an extended sequence set in underground passageways. Largely gone are the glorious colors and the sometimes comically over-the-top pageantry of some of the previous films. This is primarily a war movie, with no guarantees all your favorite remaining characters are going to make it to the finish line.
Rating: Three stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Secret In Their Eyes”
Drama, PG-13, 111 minutes
When Julia Roberts' Jess is told by a friend, "You look like you're a million years old" in "Secret in Their Eyes," there's not a speck of insult in the observation. It's said with heartbreaking compassion, and it is the truth, for Jess has become a walking ghost after suffering the worst imaginable loss. Writer-director Billy Ray's Americanization of the Argentine film that won the Academy Award for best foreign language film of 2009 features major overhauls in story and character. (In the original, the character now played by Roberts was a man whose wife was murdered.) Three members of a counterterrorism unit (Julia Roberts, Nicole Kidman and Chiwetel Ejiofor) are haunted for years by a devastating crime and the horrible injustice that followed. Roberts and Ejiofor are especially strong in this powerful gut punch of a thriller. But "Secret in Their Eyes" isn't intended as a mere guessing game about who did it and whether or not he'll have to pay for it. At times it's literally about the buried truths or untold sins in the eyes of Claire, who tells herself she's moved on from 2002, and Ray, who blames himself for the tragic events of the day.And Jess, whose eyes are so lost in grief you wonder if she even sees what's in front of her.
Rating: Three stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Spectre”
Action, Adventure, Thriller PG-13, 148 minutes
The 24th James Bond film is solidly in the middle of the all-time rankings, which means it's still a slick, beautifully photographed, action-packed, international thriller with a number of ludicrously entertaining set pieces. Daniel Craig remains a tightly coiled, deadpan funny 007, and as the sadistic villain, Christoph Waltz is wonderfully insane. Not Craig is still a tightly coiled, deadpan funny, hardcore charmer as Bond. But in "Spectre," Bond looks weary and battle-scarred, and he's getting a bit sloppy in his work, whether he's walking away from a spectacular crash scene without making sure a monstrous goon is actually dead, taking note of a security camera but neglecting to destroy surveillance video, or saying goodbye to his beautiful lover on an inexplicably empty street in London and walking away without even considering the possibility she might be snatched up by the bad guys the minute she turns the corner. This is not your Connery's James Bond.
Rating: Three stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“The Peanuts Movie”
Animation, Adventure, Comedy, 93 minutes
This movie hugs you, and you want to hug it back. The sometimes coldly efficient worlds of digital animation and gimmicky 3-D seem miles apart from the wonderfully crude line drawings of "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz, but director Steve Martino and the army of skilled technicians who created "The Peanuts Movie" have done a wonderful job capturing the familiar, old-school movements and facial expressions of Charlie Brown, Linus, Lucy, Snoopy and the rest of the gang. Thankfully, "The Peanuts Movie" is set in Charlie Brown Land, a pleasant warp of time and place somewhere around the late 1950s or early 1960s, if you had to peg it. This is a sweet, funny, smart, genuine all-ages movie with simple, timeless messages. Prepare the cockles of your heart to be warmed.
Rating: Three and a half stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“Steve Jobs”
Biography, R, 122 minutes
Much of what we see in "Burnt" confirms the 21st-century, made-FROM-television stereotypes about rock-star chefs and their colorful, sometimes rebellious supporting kitchen players.The chefs are immensely talented, manic-obsessive, insanely competitive artists who berate, belittle and abuse the free spirits, gifted newcomers and loyal veterans on their staff, all in the name of becoming the Next New Legend. As an often cliche-riddled tale of redemption on the big screen, "Burnt" is the equivalent of a sleek, well-lit, trendy restaurant serving up mildly creative dishes on an otherwise predictable menu. (OK, also predictable: critics unable to resist food metaphors in their reviews of "Burnt." Guilty as charged.) Sobered up a decade after his drug-fueled flameout, a visionary chef (Bradley Cooper) hopes his comeback can lead to a three-star Michelin rating. As an often cliche-riddled tale of redemption, "Burnt" is the equivalent of a sleek, well-lit, trendy restaurant serving up mildly creative dishes on an otherwise predictable menu.
Rating: Two stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“Steve Jobs”
Biography, R, 122 minutes
As can be said of most Apple products, this biopic of the tech visionary is a wonder to behold -- despite a few irritating glitches. In an eccentric storytelling choice, screenwriter Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle place the plot points in three distinctive, highly impressionistic acts preceding moments when Jobs (Michael Fassbender, in a mesmerizing turn) introduces the Next Big Thing.As was the case with "The Social Network" (screenplay by Sorkin) and its portrayal of Mark Zuckerberg and the birth of Facebook, we're reminded time and again in "Steve Jobs" that a man who revolutionized communication and helped hundreds of millions to connect was himself incredibly incompetent at human interaction. It's Shakespearean-level irony.
Rating: Three and a half stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“The Last Witch Hunter”
Action fantasy, PG-13, 106 minutes
How did Nicolas Cage avoid this one? "The Last Witch Hunter" does not work as campy escapism or as a guilty pleasure or as one of those movies so unintentionally funny you have to admit you were entertained from the hokey prelude through a finale that is such an obvious grab for a sequel that one of the characters might as well have said, "I feel like there's another chapter in this story!” It's just deadly and dreadful, loud and obnoxious, convoluted and irritating, horrible and dumb. Vin Diesel lumbers and mumbles his way through a performance so bad it makes his work on the "Fast and Furious" franchise look like vintage Tom Hanks by comparison. Get this. Diesel plays Kaulder, a charisma-free lunk of a 14th-century soldier for the Catholic Church who wears an extremely complicated hairdo and getup that make him look like a cross between an extra in the latest "Mad Max" film and a bass player for a heavy metal band.
Rating: One half star

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“Goosebumps”
Action, adventure, comedy PG, 103 minutes
The “Goosebumps” writer (and TV series creator) was willing to strip-mine horror formulas and flirt with time-and-“Twilight Zone” proven set-ups to give coddled kids a chance to beg mommy to leave the lights on all night. You know, because otherwise the monsters, ghosts, ghouls and the occasional killer clown or venal ventriloquist dummy might get them. So it’s a delight to report that the new “Goosebumps” movie is pretty much the perfect scary movie for kids.  A lot of jolts, a lot of laughs, a dose of “adults just don’t GET it” and a little facing one’s fears, this one bubbles out of the ooze of low expectations and manages to be, on several levels, a hoot. The frights are nothing adults or horror-crazed teens will recoil from. This is PG-mild. But if you’ve raised your kids on a steady diet of Disney/Nickelodeon and PBS pablum, don’t be surprised at that request for a bigger night-light. And that you lock those garden gnomes in the backyard shed. Otherwise, you know, R.L. Stine and his minions will get them.
Rating: Three stars

— Roger Moore, Tribune News Service

“Bridge of Spies”
Historical ,thriller PG-13, 142 minutes
You could write brief descriptions of any 100 relatively significant chapters in American history, toss 'em all into one of those hand-cranked raffle cylinders, pluck out one entry, and I'll bet Steven Spielberg could turn that event into an Oscar-bait motion picture experience. To wit: "Bridge of Spies.” Some 40 years into his career and still a master of his craft (a few camera moves and special effects moments in this film are simply dazzling), Spielberg has taken an important but largely forgotten and hardly action-packed slice of the Cold War and turned it into a gripping character study and thriller that feels a bit like a John Le Carre adaptation if Frank Capra were at the controls.Steven Spielberg has taken the largely forgotten 1960 exchange of U.S. and Soviet spies and turned it into a gripping character study and thriller that feels a bit like a John Le Carre adaptation if Frank Capra were at the controls. Tom Hanks, in full modern-day Jimmy Stewart mode, stars as the genial U.S. negotiator.
Rating: Four stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Crimson Peak”
Gothic horror, R, 119 minutes
So many movie ghosts seem to be operating from the same "Haunting Humans in the Afterlife" playbook — They wait until the dead of night to visit and they have a thing for jumping out at you just when you're convinced it was the wind you heard, usually accompanied by a jarring music sting. And they love to speak in that taunting, slightly singsong whisper voice, whether they're speaking your name over and over, or warning you to get out of the house. So it goes with the ghosts in Guillermo del Toro's visually lush and well-acted but disappointing and predictable haunted house movie "Crimson Peak.” This is one of the most beautiful and striking old-fashioned Gothic horror movies in recent memory -- but all the carefully orchestrated color schemes and all the dark corridors and secret chambers and all the flowing red metaphors in the world can't accelerate the slow patches, or make us care about lead characters who are either dim-witted or boring or both.
Rating: Two stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Pan”
Adventure, family, fantasy, PG, 111 minutes
The Peter Pan tale is an eternal favorite that infuses just a little bit of magic into everyday life, for those who don’t want to grow up. It is rich cinematic territory that has been frequently mined on the big screen: Steven Spielberg put a modern spin on the tale with the classic “Hook,” in 1991, and now Joe Wright has spun his own version of the tale, an origin story of Peter Pan himself. While it is positioned as a modern take on the classic, “Pan” doesn’t take place in present day. Peter (Levi Miller) lives in an orphanage in World War II London, under the watchful eye of evil, greedy nuns and the blasts of German bombs during the blitz. He’s an inquisitive boy who asks too many questions for his own good, which leads him to wonder where some of his fellow orphans are disappearing to in the night. Maybe it was just a hostage mentality, but somehow, in all of the craziness, the world of Never Never Land becomes strangely compelling. Make no mistake, this film falls squarely in the realm of camp classic, but it’s kind of fun in that very specific way. “Pan” is a totally odd, wacky endeavor that is amped up by John Powell’s schizophrenic score. It seems Wright threw every idea at this film, to see what stuck and only some of the ideas truly work. But there are a few flickering moments of genius among all of the riotous melee.
Rating: Two stars

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Hotel Transylvania 2”
Animation, comedy, family, PG, 89 minutes
There’s an embarrassment of riches when it comes to movies for kids. This summer has seen the likes of the emotional “Inside Out” and the brilliant claymation film “Shaun the Sheep.” But with the abundance of offerings on hand, not everything is going to reach those heights. The sequel “Hotel Transylvania 2” is cute and diverting enough, with a heartfelt family message, and unique style, but it probably won’t be joining the pantheon of animated classics. Adam Sandler voices Dracula, the proprietor of the titular hotel, and of course, he has Kevin James along to voice trusty sidekick Frankenstein. The film opens with the wedding of Dracula’s daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez) to goofball human Jonathan (Andy Samberg). This vampire-human union is at the crux of the tension in the story, particularly the fruit of that union, little Dennis (Asher Blinkoff). Ultimately, the film is about the strength of family, and accepting your loved ones for who they are — be they monsters or not. It’s a sweet message, but the film doesn’t reach the emotional depths or creative genius that other kids’ films have displayed.
Rating: Two stars

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Martian”
Sci-fi, Adventure, PG-13, 141 minutes
Finally! A botanist superhero! What took you so long, Hollywood? Ridley Scott's "The Martian" is arguably the warmest, cuddliest film ever made about the Red Planet, and that's all the more surprising given Scott's mastery of beautiful, haunting, nearly cold-to-the-touch futuristic movies such as "Blade Runner," "Alien" and “Prometheus." We love those films, but they aren't exactly warm and fuzzy. "The Martian," on the other hand, is a hopeful love letter to science and math, American resolve, the power of friendship and the dream of a world in which nations set aside their differences to unite to bring one man home. It's also a visual stunner, and it features one of our most likable and dependable actors giving a performance that ranks with anything he's ever done. Damon is terrific. The movie lives and breathes on his performance, and he comes through in every scene. Chastain is her usual brilliant self in a smallish role, Ejiofor is the guy we're rooting for to get it done on Earth, and Sean Bean brings that Ned Stark/Boromir nobility to his performance. You look at the names in this cast and you'd be correct in assuming this is going to be one helluva fun movie to watch.
Rating: Three and a half stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“Everest”
Adventure, drama, thriller, PG-13, 121 minutes
The thing about scaling a mountain is, even if you reach the peak, you have to go back down — and by that point you're exhausted, disoriented, struggling for breath and, in many cases, fending off snow blindness and frostbite and swelling of the brain, among other lovely side effects. Based on true events, filled with stunning visuals and featuring more than a half-dozen of our best actors delivering solid performances, Baltasar Kormakur's "Everest" is a high-altitude roller coaster ride that will leave you drained — even though at times it's difficult to distinguish one climber from the next in the swirl of the storm, and character development takes a back seat to the harrowing action. Inspired by the true events of 1996 that led to Jon Krakauer's best-selling nonfiction thriller "Into Thin Air," "Everest" is a dramatization of events. "Everest" does a fine job of laying out that situation -- and then the climb begins, and storms hit, and it's all about the special effects and the practical stunts, and following along with various climbers who stop short and turn back, reach the summit victoriously and/or draw their final breaths on Everest, like so many before them.
Rating: Three stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate

“The Intern”
Comedy, PG-13, 121 minutes
You know that person you meet who's so nice and smart and accommodating, who's almost predictably wonderful it's kind of annoying at first -- but then you stop resisting and realize it's not an act, and you come to kinda love being around that individual? "The Intern" is the movie version of that person. With some genuinely insightful dialogue, a number of truly funny bits of physical business, and small scenes allowing us to get to know and like a half-dozen supporting players, "The Intern" grows on us from scene to scene, from moment to moment. Despite the high-concept premise -- retired exec (Robert De Niro) interns for e-commerce mogul (Anne Hathaway) -- "The Intern" is a lovely comfort movie, nestled softly in a cynicism-free zone. De Niro and Hathaway mesh in terrific fashion and deliver utterly charming performances.
Rating: Three stars

— Richard Roeper, Universal Press Syndicate